Extension of the Export administration act of 1969
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Extension of the Export administration act of 1969 hearings and markup before the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, Ninety-fifth Congress, first session. by United States. Congress. House. Committee on International Relations.

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Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Export controls -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Hearings held March 1-31, 1977.

The Physical Object
Paginationv, 403 p. ;
Number of Pages403
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17797054M

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The Export Administration Act: Evolution, Provisions, and Debate Congressional Research Service Summary The th Congress may consider legislation to renew, modify, or reauthorize the Export Administration Act (EAA). In the th Congress, several pieces of legislation were introduced that addressed various aspects of the current system, including penalties, enforcement, diversion.   The Export Administration Act of (P.L. ) replaced the Export Control Act and relaxed the ban on non-strategic goods to communist nations while delegating author- ity to various. Provides for the continuation of rules and other administrative action under the Export Control Act of or the Export Administration Act of Makes certain technical amendments to conform to the provisions of this Act. Amends the International Investment Survey Act of to authorize appropriations for such Act through fiscal year The United States Code is meant to be an organized, logical compilation of the laws passed by Congress. At its top level, it divides the world of legislation into fifty topically-organized Titles, and each Title is further subdivided into any number of logical subtopics.

  The Export Administration Act (EAA) of (P.L. ) provided legal authority to the President to control U.S. exports for reasons of national security, foreign policy, and/or short supply. The act was in force from to , with a lapse in – During this lapse, and upon the law's expiration, the authority of export regulations was continued by executive authority. The Export Administration Act has been in existence – in one form or another – for nearly years. (Assuming you go all the way back to the Trading With The Enemy Act of ). In the late ’s, there was a reexamination of the U.S. Export Control system and a less restrictive Export Administration Act of was passed to replace.   (2) Section (eX3) of such Act (42 U.S.C. (e)(3)) is amended by striking out "section 7 of the Export Administration Act of " and inserting in lieu thereof "section 12 of the Export Administration Act of ". Extension of the Export Administration Act, Part III- Oversight to Review U.S. Export Control Policy and Proposals to Extend and Revise the Export Administration Act of , as amended- Hearings Before the Senate Comm. on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, 96th Cong., 1st Sess.

The Export Administration Regulations (EAR) are a set of regulations found at 15 C.F.R. § et are administered by the Bureau of Industry and Security, which is part of the US Commerce general, the EAR govern whether a person may export a thing from the U.S., reexport the thing from a foreign country, or transfer a thing from one person to another in a foreign country. Through the Export Administration Act (EAA), the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA), and other authority, Congress has delegated to the executive branch its express constitutional authority to regulate foreign commerce by controlling exports. modifications made in this area by the recently enacted Export Administration Act of (Act of ).7 The changes made by the Act of will be dis­ cussed in terms of their ability to solve problems which arose under the predecessor act, the Export Administration Act of (Act of ).8 In ad­. The Export Administration Act (EAA) of (P.L. ) provided legal authority to the President to control U.S. exports for reasons of national security, foreign policy, and/or short supply. The act was in force from to , with a lapse in – During this lapse, and upon the law's expiration, the authority of export regulations was continued by executive d by: the 96th United States Congress.